© 2019 Susila Gurusami

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GENDER, CRIME, AND JUSTICE (UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO)

This class uses research, cultural artifacts (films, movie clips, songs, art, etc), and personal narratives to survey ideologies and practices of punishment and criminalization from an intersectional lens. In other words, we will be thinking together about how punishment is imagined, written into law and policy, and differentially experienced and enacted by people along the dimensions of race, gender, class, sexuality, and other social locations. Course topics include: intersectionally deconstructing gender, crime, and justice; how gender and race structure punishment; disrupting the carceral, disrupting the gender binary; colonization as carceral violence; #MeToo; and reform vs. abolition.

IS ORANGE REALLY THE NEW BLACK? WOMEN, RACE, & THE CARCERAL STATE (UCLA)

What is the carceral state, and how is it shaped by race, class, and gender? 

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Each week, students read texts across sociology, geography, gender studies, and criminology in conversation with an episode of Orange is the New Black. Students study these texts to investigate carceral state building and its representations in public discourse, lived experience, and research. Particular attention will be paid to the erasure of women of color in these contexts. Guest speakers include formerly incarcerated women of color, criminal justice researchers, and formerly incarcerated UCLA students. Students propose and implement a carceral intervention of their choosing as final projects, paired with a 10-13-page research paper.

SELECTED FINAL PROJECTS: UCLA, 2014